Fubuki-class Destroyer

Description

Model depicted: -
Scale: -
 

Ships in class: 20

Type I (Fubuki)
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吹雪 Fubuki
DD-35
Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan 19 June 1926 15 November 1927 10 August 1928 Sunk in surface action off Guadalcanal [09.06S, 159.38E] on 11 October 1942; struck 15 November 1942
白雪 Shirayuki
DD-36
Yokohama Dockyard, Japan 19 March 1927 20 March 1928 18 December 1928 air attack off Dampir Strait [07.15S, 148.30E] on 3 March 1943; struck 1 April 1943
初雪 Hatsuyuki
DD-37
Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan 12 April 1927 29 September 1928 30 March 1929 Air attack off Buin [06.50S, 155.47E] on 17 July 1943; struck 15 October 1943
深雪 Miyuki
DD-38
Uraga Dock Company, Japan 30 April 1927 26 June 1928 29 June 1929 Collision with Inazuma, S Cheju Island [33N, 125.30E] on 29 June 1934; struck 15 August 1934
叢雲 Murakumo
DD-39
Fujinagata Shipyards, Japan 25 April 1927 27 September 1928 10 May 1929 Sunk in action off Guadalcanal [08.40S, 159.20E] on 12 October 1942; struck 15 November 1942
東雲 Shinonome
DD-40
Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan 12 August 1926 26 November 1927 25 July 1928 Mined off Miri [04.24N, 114E] on 17 December 1941; struck 15 January 1942
薄雲 Usugumo
DD-41
Ishikawajima Shipyards, Japan 21 October 1926 26 December 1927 26 July 1928 renamed as Usugumo 1 August 1928; Torpedoed off Etorofu [47.43N, 147.55E] on 7 July 1944; struck 10 September 1944
白雲 Shirakumo
DD-42
Fujinagata Shipyards, Japan 27 October 1926 27 December 1927 28 July 1928 renamed as Shiragumo 1 August 1928; Torpedoed off Cape Erimo [42.25N, 144.55E] on 16 March 1944; struck 31 March 1944
磯波 Isonami
DD-43
Uraga Dock Company, Japan 18 October 1926 24 November 1927 30 June 1928 renamed as Isonami on 1 August 1928; Torpedoed off SW Celebes [05.26S, 123.04E] on 9 April 1943; struck 1 August 1943
浦波 Uranami
DD-44
Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan 28 April 1927 29 November 1928 30 June 1929 Air attack W of Panay [11.50N, 123E] on 26 October 1944; struck 10 December 1944

Type II (Ayanami)

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綾波 Ayanami
DD-45
Fujinagata Shipyards, Japan 20 January 1928 5 October 1929 30 April 1930 Scuttled off Guadalcanal by Uranami [09.10S, 159.52E]; 15 November 1942; struck 15 December 1942
敷波 Shikinami
DD-46
Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan 6 July 1928 22 June 1929 24 December 1929 Torpedoed S of Hainan [18.16N, 114.40E] 12 September 1944; struck 10 October 1944
朝霧 Asagiri
DD-47
Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan 12 December 1928 18 November 1929 30 June 1930 Air attack off Guadalcanal [08S, 160.10E] on 28 August 1942; struck 1 October 1942
夕霧 Yūgiri
DD-48
Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan 1 April 1929 12 May 1930 3 December 1930 Sunk in action, central Solomons [04.44S, 154E] on 25 November 1943; struck 15 December 1943
天霧 Amagiri
DD-49
Ishikawajima Shipyards, Japan 28 November 1928 27 February 1930 10 November 1930 Mined, S of Makassar Strait [02.10S, 116.45E] on 23 April 1944; struck 10 June 1944
狭霧 Sagiri
DD-50
Uraga Dock Company, Japan 28 March 1929 23 December 1929 30 January 1931 Torpedoed off Kuching [01.34N, 110.21E] on 24 December 1941; struck 15 January 1942
Oboro
DD-51
Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan 29 November 1929 8 November 1930 31 October 1931 Air attack off Kiska Island [52.17N, 178.08E] on 16 October 1942; struck 15 November 1942
Akebono
DD-52
Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Japan 25 October 1929 7 November 1930 31 July 1931 Air attack Manila Bay [14.35N, 120.50E] on 13 November 1944; struck 10 January 1945
Sazanami
DD-53
Maizuru Naval Arsenal, Japan 21 February 1930 6 June 1931 19 May 1932 Torpedoed E of Palau [05.15N, 141.15E] on 14 January 1944; struck 10 March 1944
Ushio
DD-54
Uraga Dock Company, Japan 24 December 1929 17 November 1930 14 November 1931 surrendered to Allies 15 September 1945; scrapped 1948

The Fubuki-class destroyers were a class of twenty-four destroyers of the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Fubuki class has been described as the world's first modern destroyer. The Fubuki class set a new standard not only for Japanese vessels, but for destroyers around the world. At a time when British and American destroyers had changed little from their un-turreted, single-gun mounts and light weaponry, the Japanese destroyers were bigger, more powerfully armed, and faster than any similar class of vessel in the other fleets. They remained formidable opponents to the end of World War II, despite being much older than many of their adversaries.

Specifications

  • Fubuki-class Destroyer